2023 Films

Unseen – How We’re Failing Parent Caregivers & Why It Matters

February 28th | 7PM – 9PM | Lincoln Theatre

Many parent caregivers for children or adults who are disabled or medically complex are exhausted and isolated. Their mental and physical struggle is a public health crisis that costs us all. The “Unseen” documentary gives an unfiltered, honest glimpse into their lives to enable a change for millions of caregivers and their families.

The film follows Jess and Ryan Ronne, a blended family with 8 children, including Lucas, who has profound disabilities requiring total care. Their situation has gotten more and more challenging as Lucas gets older and stronger. With limited resources and support, caregiving takes a toll on their physical and mental health. 

It’s a common story among parent caregivers: the isolation, uncertainty about the future, lack of options, and a never-ending daily to-do list means the role of caregiver overpowers nearly every other facet of life. Video diaries from diverse caregivers featured in the film illustrate this universality, while interviews with mental health experts and policy/legal advocates provide a broader view on the societal impacts. 

Through the power of unfiltered, compelling human stories, Unseen cultivates compassion and tangible support for the caregivers in our communities.

The showing of this film is sponsored by

To visit the Unseen website, click here!


Tomorrow’s Hope

March 7th | 7PM – 9PM | Lincoln Theatre

“Tomorrow’s Hope” brings us into the journey of passionate educators and tenacious kids and their families on the south side of Chicago, determined to carve out the future despite a sea of incredible challenges.

In the film we reunite with three present-day high school seniors who had started out in the Educare preschool’s first-ever class, exploring the continuing effects of early childhood education as they navigate their way through difficult circumstances.

While today the Educare Early Education Center is going strong, in the documentary we learn about its utterly harrowing yet remarkable early stages as “The Beethoven Project” located within “Forgotonia” – a name the film’s Portia Kennel uses to describe what was at the time the largest housing project in the world.​

Exploring the contrast of promises kept against a pervasive backdrop of promises broken, “Tomorrow’s Hope” celebrates the resilience of the human spirit.

The showing of this film is sponsored by

To visit Tomorrow’s Hope website, click here!


The Bully Project

March 21st | 7PM – 9PM | Lincoln Theatre


Directed by Sundance and Emmy-award winning filmmaker, Lee Hirsch, The Bully Project is a beautifully cinematic, character-driven documentary. At its heart are those with huge stakes in this issue whose stories each represent a different facet of America’s bullying crisis. The Bully Project follows five kids and families over the course of a school year. Stories include two families who have lost children to suicide, and a mother awaiting the fate of her 14-year-old daughter who has been incarcerated after bringing a gun onto her school bus. With an intimate glimpse into homes, classrooms, cafeterias, and principals’ offices, the film offers insight into the often cruel world of the lives of bullied children.

*Please note this film has an R rating (some language)

The showing of this film is sponsored by

To visit The Bully Project website, click here!


The Most Dangerous Year

March 28th | 7PM – 9PM | Lincoln Theatre

In early 2016, when a dark wave of anti-transgender “bathroom bills” began sweeping across the nation, The Human Rights Campaign published a report identifying 2016 as the most dangerous year for transgender Americans. In Washington State six such “bathroom bills” were introduced in the State Legislature. Documentary filmmaker Vlada Knowlton captured the ensuing civil rights battle from the perspective of a small group of embattled parents as they banded together to fight a deluge of proposed laws that would strip away the rights of their young, transgender children. As one of the parents, Knowlton presents an intimate portrait of her own struggle to protect her 5-year-old transgender daughter from laws inspired by ignorance and fear.

From tension-filled Senate hearings in Olympia to intimate household settings of the families involved; from thought provoking conversations with key lawmakers to elucidating facts explained by leading scientists – The Most Dangerous Year explores the transgender civil rights battle in all its richness and complexity. While the film follows the story and outcome of anti-transgender legislation in Washington, the heart of the film lies in the stories of the families who made the decision to accept and support their kids for exactly who they are.

The showing of this film is sponsored by

To visit the The Most Dangerous Year website, click here!